Monash South Africa Law

Monash South Africa Law

Bachelor of Laws (LLB) for 2017

Why study Bachelor of Laws (LLB)?

This newly designed qualification, recently added to our programme offering, is aligned to industry, with well-defined priorities to guarantee relevance while addressing the needs of society. There is a growing need for multi-dimensional graduates with the ability to participate in an increasingly complex and dynamic local and global economy. The qualification follows on a first undergraduate degree with sufficient law-related credits and its aim is to produce competent, skilled and dynamic legal graduates, equipped with a firm knowledge and understanding of the relevant legal principles.
This advanced Bachelor of Laws Level 8 qualification aims to provide learners with a deeper understanding of the nature and function of, and an ability to apply the law, in the regulation of commercial activity. The LLB is led by the latest industry discoveries and trends, which prepare you for the world of work. Graduates of this programme are to be lifelong learners, capable of completing tasks and address problems that, while well defined, have a measure of complexity. After completing the LLB, graduates will be capable of applying the skills, knowledge and values acquired too practical scenarios and research in a legal environment, with the desire to uphold the values of the Constitution and to protect South Africa’s constitutional democracy by playing an active part in society and legal governance thereof.
This qualification aims to equip graduates with a well-rounded, broad education to produce graduates equipped with the knowledge base, theory and general rules of law. Graduates of this qualification will also hold in high regard their duty to contribute meaningfully to the development of the local and global society and economy. This qualification furthermore may enable graduates to articulate to a Master’s Degree, such as the LLM qualification and any appropriate postgraduate diplomas.
This programme is offered and certified by Monash South Africa. Successful completion of this programme leads to a Monash South Africa qualification.

  • Domestic
  • International

Entry requirements

A Level 7 qualification, and students must have successfully completed the following law subjects in their undergraduate degree:

  • Introduction to law;
  • Constitutional law;
  • Contract law;
  • Criminal law;
  • Bill of Rights
  • Law of persons; and
  • Law of family.

* Students not meeting the above minimum requirements in terms of law subjects can enrol for these subjects at Monash South Africa for non-degree purposes, prior to commencement of the LLB qualification.

Duration

2 years full-time or 4 years part-time

Fees for 2017

Fees are subject to change annually.
R 60,000.00 per annum

Intakes

First Semester (February)

Attendances

On-campus at South Africa: full-time

Course code: 3676

Career opportunities

Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to follow a career in law. In terms of employment, this qualification aims to equip the LLB graduate for: legal practice, either in the public or private sector; employment as legal advisors in the commercial or public sector or in non-governmental organisations; employment in a wide range of other careers which require the application of law; employment in an academic career; or postgraduate studies in law.

CONTACT DETAILS
South Africa Student Inquiries
Telephone: +27 11 950 4009
Email: inquiries@monash.ac.za

Monash South Africa Economics

Monash South Africa Economics

Description

Economics provides an advanced knowledge of the theories explaining and analysing the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services and focuses on how individuals, households, firms and governments interact and how economies work. Microeconomics examines the behaviour of buyers and sellers in the economy, while macroeconomics analyses the entire economy and issues affecting it, including unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and monetary and fiscal policy.

Availability

Economics is offered in the Bachelor of Business Science at Monash South Africa as a major.

Outcomes

In addition to achieving the broad outcomes of their course broadly, students successfully completing this major will be able to:

  • have an in-depth knowledge of economic theories, analytical tools, and modelling techniques to a range of contexts.

Units

No more than 12 points at level 1 may be credited to a major and at least 18 points must be credited to the major at level 3.
To complete the accounting major in the Bachelor of Business Science degree, students must complete the following eight units (48 points):

  • ECS1101 Introductory microeconomics
  • ECS1102 Introductory macroeconomics
  • ECS2141 Economics of labour markets
  • ECS2730 Intermediate macroeconomics
  • ECS2731 Intermediate microeconomics
  • ECS3121 Economics of international trade
  • ECS3143 Economics of money and banking
  • ECS3830 Competition and regulation

Relevant courses

Successful completion of this major can be counted towards meeting the requirements for the following single degrees:

  • 4415 Bachelor of Business Science
  • 4418 Bachelor of Business Science

Students in other single bachelor’s degrees may be eligible to complete the major by using 48 points of their free electives.

Monash South Africa Economics (ECS3830)

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Monash South Africa Economics (ECS3830)

6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Synopsis

This unit considers market structures, conduct and performance from the business perspective; economic policy as it affects horizontal and vertical relationships in business, particularly in relation to its dealings with consumers; the variety of approaches to competition and regulation policies from a South African and international perspective; analysis of policies with respect to prices, monopolies, oligopolies and mergers, consumer protection and licensing, deregulation, privatisation and nationalisation.

Outcomes

The learning goals associated with this unit are to:

  1. recognise differences in market structures and understand how those differences affect firms’ competitive behaviour and performance
  2. understand how and why competition causes changes in market structures by way of mergers, acquisitions, vertical integration and diversification
  3. explain the economic rationale for competitive weapons utilised by business in contemporary competitive environment, such as barriers to entry, pricing and advertising strategies, product differentiation, and innovation
  4. explain the rationale for regulation and merits of different theories of regulation
  5. explain the arguments for and against privatisation
  6. understand the main features of national competition policies in South Africa and other African nations compared to international experience
  7. critically evaluate attempts to affect competition in particular industries, e.g. electricity and telecommunications.

Assessment

Within semester assessment: 40%
Examination: 60%

Workload requirements

Minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this unit is 144 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study. Independent study may include associated readings, assessment and preparation for scheduled activities. The unit requires on average three/four hours of scheduled activities per week. Scheduled activities may include a combination of teacher directed learning, peer directed learning and online engagement.

Chief examiner(s)

Dr Tendeukayi Mugadza

Prerequisites

ECB2731 or ECG2731 or ECS2731 or ECW2731

Prohibitions

ECC3830, ECF3900, ECG3830, ECW3830, ECX3900

Undergraduate – Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Business and Economics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Tendeukayi Mugadza

Offered

South Africa

  • First semester 2017 (Day)
  • Summer semester B 2017 (On-campus block of classes)

Monash South Africa Economics (ECS3143)

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Monash South Africa Economics (ECS3143)

6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Synopsis

The concept of money, the financial system and financial intermediation, the nature and roles of the Reserve Bank, banks and non-bank financial institutions. The role and interaction of financial markets and the determination of interest rates, foreign exchange markets and the determination of exchange rates, the interaction between foreign exchange and money markets and implication for policy.

Outcomes

The learning goals associated with this unit are to:

  1. develop a knowledge of the theoretical structure of an open economy with particular emphasis on monetary policy formulation and implementation
  2. develop skills in analysis and prediction for the key economic variables when the economy is faced with internal and external market shocks
  3. be able to use an economic model that allows for competitive international capital markets and floating exchange rates to analyse policy measures.

Assessment

Within semester assessment: 40%
Examination: 60%

Workload requirements

Minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this unit is 144 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study. Independent study may include associated readings, assessment and preparation for scheduled activities. The unit requires on average three/four hours of scheduled activities per week. Scheduled activities may include a combination of teacher directed learning, peer directed learning and online engagement.

Chief examiner(s)

Dr Joel Eita

Prerequisites

Students must have passed two units from the following: ECF1100 or ECG1101 or ECS1101 or ECW1101 or ECB1101 and ECB2331 or ECF2331 or ECG2730 or ECW2730 or ECS2730 before undertaking this unit.

Prohibitions

ECB3143, ECG3143, ECF3143, ECW3143

Undergraduate – Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Business and Economics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Joel Eita

Offered

South Africa

  • Second semester 2017 (Day)

Monash South Africa Economics (ECS2731)

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Monash South Africa Economics (ECS2731)

6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Synopsis

This unit reviews the contemporary microeconomic principles. Consumer and producer theory focusing on individual consumers and firms, market processes, demand patterns, cost structures, market conditions, pricing policies, and the impact of regulation on business decisions are discussed. Cases and problems from the prescribed text, South African media, and online resources illustrate how economic concepts can be applied to specific industries. Analytical techniques and quantitative tools link the concepts to measurement and decision-making.

Outcomes

The learning goals associated with this unit are to:

  1. understand how markets work
  2. understand how customers value products
  3. understand which production and cost measures are relevant for decision making
  4. understand how competition affects business decisions on investment, production, and pricing in different market structures
  5. understand how changes in foreign exchange rates, technology, incomes, government regulations, sources of energy, the balance of payments impact on decision making.

Assessment

Within semester assessment: 40%
Examination: 60%

Workload requirements

Minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this unit is 144 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study. Independent study may include associated readings, assessment and preparation for scheduled activities. The unit requires on average three/four hours of scheduled activities per week. Scheduled activities may include a combination of teacher directed learning, peer directed learning and online engagement.

Chief examiner(s)

Dr Tendeukayi Mugadza

Prerequisites

ECB1101, ECF1100, ECG1101 or ECW1101

Prohibitions

ECB2731, ECF2931, ECG2731, ECF2731, ECW2731

Undergraduate – Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Business and Economics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Tendeukayi Mugadza

Offered

South Africa

  • Second semester 2017 (Day)
  • Summer semester B 2017 (Day)

Monash South Africa Economics (ECS2730)

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Monash South Africa Economics (ECS2730)

6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Synopsis

Measuring and interpreting macroeconomic data; consumption and investment decisions; analysis of the real exchange rate and trade balance; assets price movements; different international monetary systems; the economic benefits and costs of optimum currency areas; IS-LM mode; AD-AS model; how policy-makers in South Africa and the broader African continent try to stablise the economy.

Outcomes

The learning goals associated with this unit are to:

  1. demonstrate the impact of monetary and government policies on an open economy using the IS-LM model and AD-AS model
  2. explain the policy consequences of consumption and investment decisions
  3. explain how policies affect the trade balance and income
  4. analyse policy responses to assets price movements
  5. evaluate the economic benefits and costs of optimum currency areas.

Assessment

Within semester assessment: 40%
Examination: 60%

Workload requirements

Minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this unit is 144 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study. Independent study may include associated readings, assessment and preparation for scheduled activities. The unit requires on average three/four hours of scheduled activities per week. Scheduled activities may include a combination of teacher directed learning, peer directed learning and online engagement.

Chief examiner(s)

Dr Tendeukayi Mugadza

Prerequisites

ECB1102 or ECG1102 or ECW1102 or ECS1102

Prohibitions

ECB2330, ECB2331, ECF2331, ECG2730, ECW2730.

Undergraduate – Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Business and Economics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Tendeukayi Mugadza

Offered

South Africa

  • First semester 2017 (Day)
  • Summer semester A 2017 (Day)

Monash South Africa Economics (ECS2141)

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Monash South Africa Economics (ECS2141)

6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Synopsis

Topics include the supply of and the demand for labour, education and training, the operation of labour markets, including the role of institutions in the labour market, wage relativities, disadvantaged groups in the labour market, and the role of trade unions. Also included is a study of the macroeconomic implications of wage changes and a consideration of wages policy. Special attention is given to current labour market conditions in South Africa and the broader African continent.

Outcomes

The learning goals associated with this unit are to:

  1. understand the operation of labour markets by drawing on basic economic principle
  2. think critically about the implications of labour market activity for society
  3. recognise the issues involved in labour market activities through a consideration of issues such as unemployment and labour market disadvantage
  4. apply analytical skills developed through an analysis of continuing change in the labour market and labour market policy in South Africa and the broader African continent.

Assessment

Within semester assessment: 40%
Examination: 60%

Workload requirements

Minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this unit is 144 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study. Independent study may include associated readings, assessment and preparation for scheduled activities. The unit requires on average three/four hours of scheduled activities per week. Scheduled activities may include a combination of teacher directed learning, peer directed learning and online engagement.

Chief examiner(s)

Mr Alain Kaninda

Prerequisites

ECB1101 or ECG1101 or ECW1101 or ECP1100

Prohibitions

ECB2141, ECG2141, ECG9170, ECW2141

Undergraduate – Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Business and Economics

Offered

South Africa

  • First semester 2017 (Day)

Monash South Africa Economics (ECS1102)

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Monash South Africa Economics (ECS1102)

6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Synopsis

An introduction to the study of economics from a macroeconomic perspective including the following areas of study: trade in a global village, GDP as National Income and Aggregate Expenditure, savings and investment, unemployment, money and the South African monetary system, aggregate demand and supply in the short and long run, monetary and fiscal policy, including the related debates in South Africa as an open economy and as a major economy in Africa.

Outcomes

The learning goals associated with this unit are to:

  1. gain an insight into the product, money, labour and foreign exchange markets
  2. develop skills in the application of economic principles to wider social issues
  3. gain knowledge and understanding of the South African and African economies and their operation in an international environment
  4. acquire the basis for more advanced studies in economics
  5. demonstrate in individual summative assessment tasks the acquisition of a comprehensive understanding of the topics covered.

Assessment

Within semester assessment: 40%
Examination: 60%

Workload requirements

Minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this unit is 144 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study. Independent study may include associated readings, assessment and preparation for scheduled activities. The unit requires on average three/four hours of scheduled activities per week. Scheduled activities may include a combination of teacher directed learning, peer directed learning and online engagement.

Chief examiner(s)

Mr Alain Kaninda

Prohibitions

ECB1102, ECF1200, ECG1102, ECW1102

Undergraduate – Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Business and Economics

Coordinator(s)

Mr Alain Kaninda

Offered

South Africa

  • First semester 2017 (Day)
  • Second semester 2017 (Day)
  • Summer semester B 2017 (Day)

Monash South Africa Economics (ECS1101)

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Monash South Africa Economics (ECS1101)

6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Synopsis

An introduction to the study of economics; consumer behaviour; demand and supply and the operation of markets; market efficiency and welfare; welfare effects of international trade; public sector economics; the behaviour of firms and the organisation of an industry; market structures – perfect competition and monopoly; economies of the labour market.

Outcomes

The learning goals associated with this unit are to:

  1. understand the theoretical foundations of economics
  2. understand generic skills essential for progression to upper level units by applying rigorous thinking and understanding to analytical geometric models
  3. appreciate economics as an evolutionary science and its ability to address, in a microeconomic framework, the persistent social and economic problems confronted by society
  4. demonstrate in individual summative assessment task the acquisition of a comprehensive understanding of the topics covered in this unit.

Assessment

Within semester assessment: 40%
Examination: 60%

Workload requirements

Minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this unit is 144 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study. Independent study may include associated readings, assessment and preparation for scheduled activities. The unit requires on average three/four hours of scheduled activities per week. Scheduled activities may include a combination of teacher directed learning, peer directed learning and online engagement.

Chief examiner(s)

Mr Alain Kaninda

Prohibitions

ECB1101, ECF1100, ECG1101, ECW1101, ECP1100

Undergraduate – Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Business and Economics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kwane Osei-Assibey (Semester 1), Dr J-L. Mubenga-Tshitaka (Semester 2)

Offered

South Africa

  • First semester 2017 (Day)
  • Second semester 2017 (Day)
  • Summer semester A 2017 (Day)

Monash South Africa Courses

Monash South Africa Courses

Courses

A degree of difference

A qualification from Monash South Africa is your ticket to a world of possibilities.

Foundation Programme

  • Foundation Programme

Bachelor Degrees

  • Bachelor of Business Science
  • Bachelor of Business Science (Accounting)
  • Bachelor of Computer and Information Sciences
  • Bachelor of Public Health
  • Bachelor of Social Science

Honours Degrees

  • Bachelor of Business Science (Honours)
  • Bachelor of Computer and Information Sciences (Honours)
  • Bachelor of Public Health (Honours)
  • Bachelor of Social Science (Honours)

Postgraduate Diplomas

  • Postgraduate Diploma in Accounting
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Management specialising in Corporate Governance
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Management specialising in HIV/AIDS and Health

Master Degrees

  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of International Business
  • Master of Philosophy
  • Master of Philosophy in Computer and Information Science
  • Master of Philosophy in Integrated Water Management

Enrolment and Orientation

Enrolment and orientation are two weeks of events designed to help you officially start your Monash journey – so it’s really important you come along and attend all the relevant events. We’ll help you settle in and provide you with information to fully prepare you for the start of classes and life at Monash South Africa.

Your Enrolment Date

Please attend your allocated enrolment day, if you have not enrolled prior to enrolment week. If you have already enroled and have your student card, please join us for Orientation.

Semester 1 2017

Postgraduate Diplomas
Master Degrees
Saturday 4 Feb
School of Social Science Monday 13 Feb
School of Business and Economics Tuesday 14 Feb
School of IT and Health Sciences Wednesday 15 Feb
Foundation Programme (all streams) Thursday 16 Feb
Honours courses Friday 17 Feb
Orientation Week  20 – 24 Feb

Semester 2 2017

Postgraduate Diplomas
Master Degrees
Saturday 8 July
School of Social Science Monday 10 July
School of Business and Economics Tuesday 11 July
School of IT and Health Sciences Wednesday 12 July
Foundation Programme (all streams) Thursday 13 July
Honours courses Friday 14 July
Orientation Week  17 – 21 July

What To Bring On Your Enrolment Day

  • Proof of payment for your tuition & accommodation fees – minimum 30% payment required for local students
  • All original copies of your academic results (if not sent before)
  • Original identity document if you are South African

International Students Should Also Bring

  • Proof of payment for your tuition & accommodation fees – minimum 80% payment required for international students
  • Original passport with valid study permit (your enrolment won’t be processed without this!)
  • Proof of medical insurance

What About Orientation Week

We have an exciting line-up of activities and events planned for you for this week to help you settle in, learn the ropes and make new friends.

Why Should I Attend?

Orientation is compulsory for both new students and continuing students who are starting a new course. It’s a great opportunity to:

  • Make new friends and explore your new campus
  • Take part in activities and events
  • Find out about different teaching and learning processes at Monash
  • Learn about your classes and get to know your lecturers
  • Sign up for your my.monash account
  • Attend lab sessions, as well as the Library and Learning commons orientation
  • Meet your course advisers to discuss unit selection and course structure
  • Ask any questions you have about your studies